Sucettes120917
Sucettes at Pet Shop Gallery Dec. 9, 2017.

Welcome to Lazy-i, an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news.

The focus is on the indie music scene. Yes, there’s a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area, but Lazy-i also offers interviews, stories and reviews about national indie bands.

Most of the feature stories and columns in Lazy-i will have previously been published in The Reader, Omaha’s monthly alternative newspaper.



Satchel Grande tonight; Lodgings, Relax, It’s Science Saturday; Dr. Dog, The Nude Party, Single Mothers Sunday…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 1:19 pm February 22, 2019

Lodgings at O’Leaver’s, Dec. 2, 2017. The band plays at The Brothers Saturday..

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Somebody put a stake through the heart of winter so we can get back to something normal weather-wise? Sounds like tonight and Saturday night could be a shit-storm. If you go out, be careful, people.

Tonight’s big show is Satchel Grande at The Waiting Room. They always bring the party. Omaha Beat Brigade kicks it off at 9 p.m. $8.

And that’s it for tonight.

Tomorrow night (Saturday), the big show is at Brothers Lounge where Lodgings headlines. Opening is the double-bass attack of Relax, It’s Science and Lincoln power trio Her Flyaway Manner. $5, 10 p.m.

Also Saturday night, Mike Schlesinger plays at The Sydney in Benson with Dirt House and Tom Bartolomei. 9 p.m. $5.

Sunday night Dr. Dog headlines the big room at The Slowdown. The Nude Party opens at 8 p.m. $25 Adv/$28 DOS.

Meanwhile, over at Lookout Lounge, Ontario punkers Single Mothers headlines Sunday night. Mobina Galore, Kill Vargas and Uh Oh open at 8 p.m. $10.

And that’s all I got. If I missed your show, put it in the comments section. Have a great weekend.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

#TBT: Album Review: Box, Burdens of the a.m. (from Lazy-i.com, 1999?); Vundabar tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 12:00 pm February 21, 2019

Box, Burdens of the a.m. (1999, Spillway)

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

This is really going back, maybe 20 years? Funny thing, I can’t find mention of this album anywhere on the internet. When I do a search, it takes me to a 2012 Spotify entry that is unplayable. 

I originally wrote that Mark Weber, who was in Box, was in Clarence Tilton. Wrong Weber, though if you listened to this, you could see where I might have made that mistake… 

Box

Burdens of the a.m.

Spillway Records

Omaha’s own, Box calls its sound “rural rock,” because the members all come from small towns in the area “where their roots run strong.” Whatever you want to label it, it’s definitely well-crafted, radio-friendly southern-styled pop music that, when it’s at its most honest, recalls a feeling of dirt roads, corn fields and silos. They’re at their best on the slower, acoustic-based tracks, like “Best I’ve Got,” and “St. Peter,” that can best be compared to Lonesome Jubilee-era John Mellencamp or the Jayhawks. The faster, rave-up numbers are more twangy and will immediately make you think of the Gin Blossoms. Mark Weber’s voice so eerily resembles Gin Blossom’s Jesse Valenzuela’s that he could break into his house if it was protected by a voiceprint lock. Songs “Dragline,” “Round the Block” and “Fall,” continue to push the comparison along, thanks to song structures that also seem to match old Gin Blossoms’ tracks. And that isn’t such a bad thing… as long as you like the Gin Blossoms. Based on the band’s sheer musical talent, there’s tons of room for Box to develop a more unique, and ultimately, more satisfying style. Until then, kick up your boots and enjoy. — Lazy-i.com, sometime in 1998 or ’99…

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Vundabar plays tonight at Reverb Lounge. The Boston. Mass indie rock trio truly is indie, releasing  stuff on their own Gawk Records label, and Bandcamp, of course. And catching some traction, thanks to lots of touring. They’ve been on the road since late January and won’t be home until sometime next month, supporting their most recent album, 2018’s Smell Smoke, an album that received a massive 7.8 rating from Pitchfork, which said “Vundabar have brilliantly crafted an album that feels like it resonates with joy and sorrow both here and in the hereafter.” Chicago by way of Madison indie band Slow Pulp and our very own The Natural States open at 8 p.m. $14.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Fred Armisen at The Slowdown; Kikagaku Moyo at The Waiting Room, Moonraker at The Brothers…

Category: Blog — Tags: , — @ 1:29 pm February 20, 2019

Fred Armisen performs tonight at The Slowdown.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Tonight’s Fred Armisen show is still very much on despite this morning’s snowmaggeden. The Portlandia star will perform everything from hardcore punk (Crisis of Conformity) to yacht-rock (the Blue Jean Committee), according to this Rolling Stone article about the tour.

From the article:

Armisen’s stage personas, premiered during his tenure on SNL from 2002 to 2013, lovingly blur the line between parody and tribute. The eclectic catalog includes Seventies yacht-rock (the Blue Jean Committee), artful Eighties synth-pop (the Fingerlings), hardcore punk (Crisis of Conformity), suave piano pop (Joshua Rainhorn) and Brazilian Bossa nova (Paulinho e Beatriz).

Armisen has quite an indie rock pedigree including stints with Les Savy Fav, Matthew Sweet and Devo. Sounds like fun. The show’s been sold out for weeks, by the way. Starts at 8 p.m.

Also tonight, Kikagaku Moyo plays at The Waiting Room. The Tokyo-based psychedelic rock band’s sound incorporates elements of Krautrock, Indian ragas and acid folk. Very lush stuff. Very proggy. And what difference does it make if you don’t understand the words? This one could be interesting. Portland psych quartet Weeed opens at 8 p.m. $15.

Finally, intense Santa Clarita punkers Moonraker play tonight at The Brothers. Their last LP,  Lanterns, was released on Tiny Dragon Music. Dsm5 and Hand Painted Police Car open at 9 p.m. $5.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Do Ryan Adams’ records sound different this week?; The Love Language, Bokr Tov tonight at The Sydney…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 2:43 pm February 18, 2019

The Love Language plays tonight at The Sydney in Benson.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

I’ve never been a fan of Ryan Adams. Not sure why, but his music just never resonated with me. And though I’ve listened to a few of his albums, I was more aware of his odd stage antics and past erratic behavior than his music.

So when The New York Times published this article last Wednesday with the subhead: “Several women say Adams offered to jumpstart their music careers, then pursued them sexually and in some cases retaliated when they spurned him. He denies the claims.” it had no material impact on how I felt about his music. But I can see where it would for his fans, even though not a note of his songs changed one iota from what they were before the article came out.

I’m a Woody Allen fan. I’ve loved his films all my life. But as one allegation after another gets hoisted in Allens’ direction — all of which he’s denied — they cannot help but echo in the back of my mind while I hear his voice narrating during Radio Days or see him flirt with Diane Keaton in Play It Again, Sam. Allen is now fighting with Amazon who pulled out of a deal for future Allen films. He’s suing, of course, and Amazon will likely settle for an ungodly amount if only to rid themselves of the perceived stigma of being associated with Woody Allen.

That said, I still laugh out loud whenever I see the “Coke Scene” in Annie Hall. Should I feel guilty? Because I don’t.

This is a long way of asking what will Ryan Adams’ fans do with all those albums? Will they still listen to and enjoy Heartbreaker as much as they did before last Wednesday? Is it OK to still like his music? Or now that he’s been unveiled, is his music unlistenable? Because they’re the same songs they were before last Wednesday…

* * *

Merge recording artist The Love Language plays tonight at The Sydney in Benson. The Raleigh, N.C., band fronted by Stuart McLamb has been kicking around since 2009 playing a free-wheeling style of indie pop that sits well alongside bands like The Rosebuds and Arcade Fire. Except for the yacht-rock-flavored single “Juiceboxx,” the new record, Baby Grand (2018, Merge), is more layered and spacier than past efforts, one might even deploy the overused term “shoe-gaze” to describe it. Locals Bokr Tov open at 8 p.m. $10.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Dross (and Slowdown’s new sound system), The Natural States, Todd Snider tonight; Lissie Sunday…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , , — @ 1:37 pm February 15, 2019

Singer/songwriter Todd Snider plays at Scottish Rite Hall Saturday tonight.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Two reasons to go to Slowdown Jr. tonight.

The first is to hear The Slowdown’s new sound system. When the bar first opened 11 years ago it boasted the best sound system in the area and quickly earned national huzzahs as one of the finest music venues in the country. Now I’m told by OEA Award winning sound engineer Dan Brennan that both Slowdown’s big room and front room have brand new audio systems.

Which brings us to the second reason to head down to Slowdown tonight. Opening band Dross features members of Noah’s Ark Was a Spaceship and Mint Wad Willy, and will be the perfect break-in band for the new audio experience. Also on the bill are Jump the Tiger and Two Shakes. Dross kicks it off at 9 p.m. $8.

What else is happening this weekend?

Well, over at The Sydney in Benson tonight local indie band The Natural States opens for Unmanned and Living Conditions. 10 p.m., $5.

Meanwhile, over at Scottish Rite Hall tonight singer/songwriter Todd Snider performs. Seems like Snider’s been coming through Omaha for decades. Kevin Gordon opens at 8 p.m. $40.

Saturday night is wide open, people. I suggest heading over to The Sydney for the return of the Benson Soul Society. It’s free and starts at 10 p.m.

Sunday night singer/songwriter Lissie headlines at The Waiting Room with Roscoe and Etta. $18 Adv/$20 DOS.

And that’s all I got. If I missed your show, put it in the comments section. Have a great weekend.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

#TBT: When are you too old to rock? (Lazy-i: Feb. 5, 2009)…

Category: Column — Tags: , , — @ 1:42 pm February 14, 2019

And then there’s Keith…

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Ten years later this message still applies. And while I’m no less enamored with music — old or new — I’ve slowed down when it comes to going to shows, both because of work-related reasons and the fact that there simply are fewer indie shows these days (though things are looking up).

One other side note: A local musician recently asked me to help promote an upcoming show in Lazy-i and asked if I knew other channels that might be appropriate. I mentioned a couple folks with strong social media presences and strong connections to the scene. It dawned on me afterward both people I mentioned were in their 60s, and I’m in my 50s. Where are all the young champions for local music and shows?

Column 208: Greasy Kid’s Stuff
Age and music.
Lazy-i, Feb. 5, 2009

I was feeling just fine about everything until Barack decided to join in with his “Let us set aside childish things” rant during the inauguration. What exactly was he saying? Who was he talking to?

After awhile, it does begin to pile up. The whole age thing never occurs to me unless someone else mentions it — directly or indirectly.

Last week a friend who works at The City Weekly pointed out that Mike Fratt “went after me” in his column. Really? By name? No, he never used your name, my friend said. He merely referenced “Omaha’s own aging indie-hipster blogger street weekly writer…” I was flattered that Mike would think anyone would even know who he was talking about (and without that knowledge, a reader would think Fratt was being self-deprecating instead of just snarky — he is, after all, considerably older than I am).

A week before that, I was at a local watering hole listening to a band when one of the city’s better musicians said, not off-handedly, “Why would a 20-year-old want to know what a 40-year-old guy thinks about new music?” He was making a point about himself, of course; about how he thinks no one cares what his favorite music was from 2008 (but we do). I’m sure the fact that I’m in my 40s and still write about indie music never crossed his mind. Did it?

And then there was the time I was speaking in front of a class alongside a former mover-and-shaker in local music retail. I asked him what he thought of Saddle Creek Records. He said he only listens to blues these days. “I outgrew that stuff a long time ago.”

It comes down to the notion that rock music — specifically new rock music — should only be enjoyed by young people. That people beyond their 20s (some say beyond their teens) should have moved on from listening to rock or any music for that matter.

I remember as a teen-ager listening to albums with my headphones on, wondering how much I’d miss it when I got older because, well, “old people” don’t listen to music. Certainly my dad didn’t.

That same backward thinking applies to rock shows — when are you too old to go see a band (other than a dinosaur act at the Qwest Center)? Is it when your friends quit going to shows? Or when you have kids and reprioritize your life so that music no longer plays a role? I can’t speak to the issue of getting married and having a family. I can say that a lot of people I know put music away when their children arrived, and use their family life as an excuse for not going out any more (or doing anything creative, for that matter). And that’s fine. Chances are even if they didn’t have kids they would have quit going to shows anyway. Rare is the person who can continue to “get into” new music after they reach their 30s. That’s just the way it is.

I made that point on my blog, and one reader took offense. He said he used to go to shows at The Cog Factory and Kilgore’s before moving to Chicago and getting involved in the music business himself. He ended up in California “…and then, I had kids. Now you can chalk it up as an ‘excuse’ to ‘quit’ the pursuit of music-passion (or other cultural endeavors), but I actually blame it as much on not only a re-prioritizing of priorities as I do finances,” he said in an email. “When you’ve got a young mouth (or in my case two young mouths) to feed, given the choice between buying groceries or going out to a club to see a band play and then proceed to spend $25 on drinks….well, the choice should be pretty clear.”

I guess it’s like those commercials say: “Having a baby changes everything.” I don’t doubt that. Still, this guy said he continues to subscribe to Magnet and The Big Takeover, and makes notes about bands that might interest him. That alone makes him a rarity. Because most people I know who have kids go home after work and sit in front of the TV for five hours and then go to sleep. Every night. They feel entitled. They’ve worked hard all day, they want to come home and “unwind.” These are people in their late 20s and 30s (and 40s). And before they know it, they’re in their 50s and 60s and then they’re dead. But, dammit, they accomplished something. They raised those kids. And that’s more than I can say for myself.

Would I still be going to shows if I had kids? Well, not 80 to 100 shows a year, but yeah, I’d like to think that I’d definitely make it out at least a couple times a month. But we’ll never know.

Age isn’t so much a state of mind as it is surrendering to a state of mind. I don’t think my personal writing guru, former Village Voice columnist and now Rolling Stone critic Robert Christgau, who’ll turn 67 in April, thought for a second about what was appropriate for someone his age to listen to when he was reviewing the latest albums by Glasvegas (which he gave in A) or Jay Reatard (which he gave an A-). Is he worried that a 20-year-old might scoff at his opinion? I don’t think it crossed his mind. It certainly doesn’t cross mine when I’m writing about the new Animal Collective or Ladyfinger CDs or watching Stolen Kisses or Perry H. Matthews.

Nor should it. Rock was never meant to be only a young man’s game. Just ask this aging indie-hipster blogger street weekly writer. — Lazy-i Feb. 5, 2009, this also was published in The City Weekly at around the same time.

* * *

By the way, Robert Christgau has a new book out called Is It Still Good to Ya?: Fifty Years of Rock Criticism, 1967-2017, which is definitely worth your time, not to mention his XGau Sez entries, which are somewhat awesome. He’s not slowing down at all.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Unexplained Death (a.k.a. Matt Whipkey and band) takes on the Ricketts family…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 2:32 pm February 13, 2019

A screen cap from the new Unexplained Death video for “Wall Street Pete (Daddy’s Money).”

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Matt Whipkey has been working on a secret project for a number of months. He’s known for a style of music that falls somewhere in the folk rock / Americana / alt country / singer-songwriter genres. The new project, going by the name Unexplained Death, is Whipkey’s take on punk as only he can.

His first angry solvo has been hurled at Pete Ricketts and the Ricketts family in general. Called “Wall Street Pete (Daddy’s Money)” it throws the Ricketts spaghetti agaisnt the wall. See what pieces stick below.

I asked Whipkey, “Why punk, why now?”

“Look at the world; it’s a flaming shit storm. In all directions, fireballs of shit flying,” Whipkey said. “A lot of musicians are speaking out against the current state of affairs and that is great, but a lot of these songs are borderline lullabies.”

Whipkey’s abrupt change in musical style also is the result of too often being hung with the “Americana, singer/songwriter” genre tag. “I’ve carried it for a long time,” he said.

So is what he’s doing punk? Probably not in the truest sense. This song and others off the upcoming collection fall closer to Replacements-style indie rock.

“When I was learning to play guitar, these were the kind of jams I first figured out,” he said. “Fast and loud is definitely part of my nature. In no way am I claiming to be a punk purist. I still like melody too much. But the energy it carries has always been a part of my identity.”

The Unexplained Death songs were mostly recorded in Whipkey’s unfinished basement. “I did the drums for some songs at Scott Gaeta’s (studio),” Whipkey said. “I mixed all the songs and even played everything (sans drums).”

He’s looking for a record label to put it out, but, “I have little hope because the music industry is also part of that flaming shit storm.”

We’re all still waiting for the first Unexplained Death rock show; do you hear that Lookout Lounge and The Brothers?

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Gang of One (um, Four), Eric in Outerspace tonight at Slowdown Jr…

Category: Blog — Tags: , — @ 1:51 pm February 12, 2019

Gang of Four plays tonight at Slowdown, Jr.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

I’m one of the odd ones. Even if all four members of Gang of Four were playing tonight at The Slowdown there’s a pretty good chance I wouldn’t go see them. I’m just not interested in heritage acts whose heyday was 40 years ago.

That said, I do get the appeal. Most (almost all) people not only are more enamored with the music they grew up with, but it’s the only music they can bear to listen to. Play a new band or a new sound for them and you’re bound to get a pinched-face reaction. It’s human nature, folks, which makes me a freak of nature, because I’d much rather hear something I haven’t heard before than to rehash the past with new actors in the power positions.

And don’t get me started on cover/tribute bands. Like I said, I understand the appeal — music-wise, people love what they’re familiar with, which is why cover bands always have made multiples above what original local bands earn on a given night. Such is life.

So, tonight is Gang of Four down at Slowdown Jr., with one original member, guitarist Andy Gill. And while I’m not going, I’d much rather see this band than, say, a Gang of Four tribute band. At least you’re getting one of the original gang, and a nice selection of oldies along with their newies.

Their Feb. 5 set at The Casbah in San Diego included “Anthrax,” “He’d Send an Army” “I Love a Man in Uniform” and “At Home He’s a Tourist” among its 17-song set list, which you can view right here.

By the Way, this is a Slowdown Jr. show — i.e., in the front room. I’m surprised it isn’t sold out yet. Opening is our very own Eric in Outerspace, so get there early. 8 p.m., $25.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Live Review: Lupines, Chase the Ghost; Kacey Musgraves and the Grammys…

Category: Reviews — Tags: , , , — @ 1:41 pm February 11, 2019

Lupines at O’Leaver’s Feb. 9, 2019…

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Quite a coincidence that two Grammy winners also played at O’Leaver’s Saturday night.

Lupines frontman John Ziegler accepted the award for Best Rock Performance last night surrounded by the rest of the band. Ziegler thanked the academy and “his team” that includes his record label and its army of marketing personnel that have made Lupines a household name. Wearing a classic Nudie Cohn suit, bassist Mike Tulis saluted fellow nominees Artic Monkeys and Greta Van Fleet before flipping off the star-studded audience to roars of applause.

On the other hand, after accepting their award for Best New Artist, Chase the Ghost members Brian Tait and Reagan Roeder were immediately detained by federal law enforcement agents the moment they walked off stage. I’m told they’ve since escaped custody and currently are hiding out at Grammy President Neil Portnow’s plush Malibu compound.

Chase the Ghost at O’Leaver’s Feb. 9, 2019.

That Best New Artist award was a real surprise for everyone as Saturday night’s O’Leaver’s gig was (I believe) only the second performance ever by Chase the Ghost. The duo puts an extra helping of “psychedelic” in their psych-rock style, resulting in a strange outer-body experience. Reagan was in his usual good voice on these stripped-down indie-flavored hoe-downs. Tait, looking like a young Hunter S. Thompson in white cowboy hat, white glasses and white patent-leather shoes, sported one of the more unique drumming styles in recent memory, bashing out rhythms while adding backing howls. Great stuff, though the duo only played four songs after Roeder’s guitar suffered a technical mishap.

Reagan couldn’t put a date on when they’ll play again. Neither could Tait, though he said they hope to release a recording (possibly even on vinyl). And they have this video (below), which encapsulates the duo’s essence quite accurately.

They were followed by the always awesome Lupines. I’ve seen these guys a million times and every time I walk away saying to myself, “They deserve a Grammy for Best Rock Performance.” I don’t know what more to say other than, along with David Nance, they’re my favorite rock band from this area. If you haven’t seen them (especially if you’re a fan of Nance’s sound, which is currently grabbing national attention), you owe yourself the favor.

* * *

Speaking of The Grammys, I’ve been listening to the big winner Kacey Musgrave’s album, Golden Hour, all morning. I know it’s been said before (by Kevin Coffey last night, for example), but this isn’t what I consider a “country” album. It’s more like a middle-of-the-road folk-rock record. Anyone who remembers when KFAB used to play music back in the ’70s and ’80s will recognize this sound — harmless 4/4 background music perfect for an evening of grocery shopping at your local Hinky Dinky. Well done for sure. Nice. Who remembers Crystal Gayle? Anne Murray? Juice Newton?

Even Pitchfork gave this record a great review (strangely). I guess the country classification comes from her slight twang? The occasional banjo? The single “Space Cowboy”? Or is this where country music resides these days? Maybe it has for awhile. Or maybe it’s because Musgraves music doesn’t fit in any other category…

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Ten Questions with DeVotchKa (@ TWR Feb. 10); Samantha Crane, About-Face, Cult Play tonight; Lupines, Janglepop Saturday…

Category: Interviews — Tags: , , , , — @ 1:51 pm February 8, 2019

Devotchka plays at The Waiting Room Sunday night.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

“Devotchka” is a Russian word for “girl,” according to Wikipedia, whereas DeVotchKa is a Denver four-piece fronted by brassy crooner Nick Urata. The band’s history dates back to 1997 and 11 studio albums including their latest, This Night Falls Forever (2018, Concord Records), a romantic collection of lush ballads that, on tracks like “Done with Those Days,” and opener “Straight Shot” sees Urata channeling such vintage vocalists as Roy Orbison and Chris Isaak.

One common thread in these songs is their sentimentality,” Urata says. “When you first discover rock and roll, that’s usually the same time you’re discovering girls or boys, when everything is so romantic and huge — that era of your life is where these songs are coming from.”

We caught up with Urata and gave him the Ten Questions treatment. Here’s eight of his answers:

1. What is your favorite album?

Nick Urata: Revolver by the Beatles. Every song on it is a classic and in a genre of its own. The moment I heard it I knew I had to make music.

2. What is your least favorite song?

The “877 Kars 4 Kids” (jingle/commercial)

3. What do you enjoy most about being in a band?

I’ve always wanted to be in a band. I’ve been in so many that fell apart when you find one that works it’s like magic. To have brothers and sisters in music, to share the peaks and valleys of this life is a blessing.

4. What do you hate about being in a band?

“Hate” is a strong word, but if you’re serious about your band it takes over every aspect of your life.

5. What is your favorite substance (legal or illegal)?

I left (this one and No. 10) blank. They will just get me in trouble…

6. In what city or town do you love to perform?

Omaha, obviously.

7. What city or town did you have your worst gig (and why)?

There have been a few.  When we look back it turns out our home town of Denver is the sight of some of our worst disasters. Mostly because that’s where we cut our teeth and learned how to put on a show. It’s always the ones that you think are going to be earth-shattering that are the biggest let down. For us early on we were asked to open for Marilyn Manson, we were elated, but the reality was a harsh one. I thought his fans would be enlightened and open to something different, but the diehards up front hated us and made our first arena show a nightmare, it was also the day GW got re-elected, very dark…

8. Are you able to support yourself through your music? If so, how long did it take to get there; if not, how do you pay your bills?

It goes back to my previous answer: If you are willing to give up any semblance of a normal life you can eventually quit your day job. I’m happy to report we all have.

9. What one profession other than music would you like to attempt; what one profession would you absolutely hate to do?

I would love to be a cinematographer, but I’m not sure I can even spell it so I guess that says something, but I think the fact that we can capture our world in such a beautiful light is a miracle we take for granted and future dystopian generations will cherish.

On the flip side, anything around an airport or church.

10. What are the stories you’ve heard about Omaha, Nebraska?

Devotchka plays with Neyla Pekarek (formerly of The Lumineers) Sunday, Feb. 10, at The Waiting Room, 6212 Maple Street. Tickets are $25 Adv/$60 M&G. For more information, go to onepercentproductions.com

* * *

Now onward to the rest of the weekend…

Acclaimed singer/songwriter Samantha Crain headlines tonight at fabulous O’Leaver’s. She’s a Choctaw singer, songwriter, poet, producer and musician from Oklahoma and a two-time Native American Grammy Award winner. Sean Pratt and McCarthy Trenching open at 10 p.m. $10.

Meanwhile, over at The Sydney in Benson, Cult Play headlines with Lincoln band Universe Contest and Dross (members of Noah’s Ark Was a Spaceship). 10 p.m., $5.

There’s also a four-band emo show at West O bar Dr. Jack’s Drinkery, 3012 No. 102nd St. Headlining is Nebraska band About-Face, with Missouri act Faintheart, and Nebraska bands Midwest Coasta and Phantom Killer. $10, 9 p.m.

Tomorrow night (Saturday) it’s back to O’Leaver’s for the amazing Lupines. Also on the bill are Las Cruxes and Chase the Ghost (Reagan Roeder/Brian Tait madness). $5, 10 p.m.

Also happening Saturday night is the return of ’90s/’00s Omaha act Janglepop at Reverb Lounge. Read this ancient article about the band here. Modern-day jangle-pop alt-country band Clarence Tilton opens at 8 p.m. $5.

And that’s all I got. If I missed your show, put it in the comments section. Have a great weekend.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

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