#TBT: The Wrens, The Meadowlands (2003, Absolutely Kosher)…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 2:20 pm February 7, 2019

The Wrens, The Meadowlands (2003, Absolutely Kosher)

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

With no news, on Throwback Thursday I thought I’d advocate for you to rediscover The Wrens 2003 magnum opus The Meadowlands.

I had the good fortune of interviewing The Wrens’ guitarist/vocalist Charles Bissell a.k.a. Charles Mexico and writing a story about the making of that album in support of a Sokol Underground gig they played with Criteria back in the day. Turned out, there was an Omaha connection to the record’s origins. From the story:

By the summer of ’99, The Wrens were close to calling it quits. The album that they had expected to take four weeks to record had lingered for six months. That’s when Bissell received a call from someone he’d met at the band’s first-ever show — an August 10, 1994, gig with Babe the Blue Ox and Big Drill Car at the Capitol Bar & Grill in downtown Omaha. It was Todd Baechle of the then little-known band The Faint.

“Robb Nansel (who runs Saddle Creek Records) and Todd wanted to set up a show with us in New Jersey,” Bissell said. “We kept putting them off, trying to tell them we weren’t playing anymore, which sounded preposterous since we were six months into making the record. So we had a nifty loft party for them in Hoboken and played drunk, which is very rare for us. They had just defined their new sound and played this great set. We didn’t play again for four years. They went on to become virtual powerhouses.”

It would be four years after that loft party before The Meadowlands was released and became an instant classic. It still holds up today, almost 16 years later.

As for “where are they now”: According to their last news update on wrens.com the band just finished mastering a batch of new songs. Unfortunately, that last news update was dated January 5, 2017…

Check out the album on Spotify:

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Lincoln Exposed 2019 kicks off; Hunny, Hockey Dad tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 1:44 pm February 6, 2019

Lincoln Exposed 2019 runs tonight through Saturday.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

It’s year 14 for Lincoln Exposed, the annual week-long multi-bar showcase that celebrates the Star City’s music scene.

With forecasts calling for three to six inches of snow tonight, the timing couldn’t be any better to get stuck in Lincoln for a few days! The five venues participating this year are The Zoo Bar, Duffy’s Tavern, Bodega’s Alley, Bourbon Theatre and 1867 Bar.

Festival passes are $25, while day passes are:

Wednesday and  Thursday – $8 per day
Friday and Saturday – $10 per day

Here’s the sched:

Wednesday, Feb. 6

ZOO BAR
6-6:40 – Orion Walsh & The Ramblin’ Hearts
7-7:40 – The Whiskey Drinkers Union
8-8:40 – Rock Paper Cities
9-9:40 – Brazen Throats
10-10:40 – The Wise
11-11:40 – Sapien Sounds
12-12:40 – Within Wilds

DUFFY’S TAVERN
7:40-8:20 – Cynge
8:40-9:20 – They Exclaim!
9:40-10:20 – Thirst Things First
10:40-11:20 – Manslaughterer
11:40-12:20 – CJ Clydesdale Band

BOURBON THEATRE
7:20-8:00 – Ashes of Immolation
8:20-9:00 – 8th Day Broken
9:20-10:00 – The Credentials
10:20-11:00 – Histrionic
11:20-12:00 – Sons of Thursday

BODEGA’S ALLEY
8:00-8:40 – Gamma Goat
9:00-9:40 – Shit Flowers
10-10:40 – Root Marm Chicken Farm Jug Band
11-11:40 – 23rd Vibration
12-12:40 The Hanyaks

1867 BAR
7:40-8:20 – Domestica
8:40-9:20 – Featherfoot Charlie
9:40-10:20 – Hosting Monsters
10:40-11:20 – Pure Brown
11:40-12:20 – Seymour

Thursday, Feb. 7

ZOO BAR
6:00-6:40 – Tim Budig Band
7:00-7:40 – The House Band
8:00-8:40 – Tie These Hands
9:00-9:40 – Curtis Beard
10:00-10:40 – Powerful Science
11:00-11:40 – MrMc$
12:00-12:40 Will Hutchinson Band

DUFFY’S TAVERN
7:40-8:20 – St. Luis and the Bottom Boys
8:40-9:20 – Plastic Garbage
9:40-10:20 – Death Cow
10:40-11:20 – The Bottle Tops
11:40-12:20 – Mad Dog and the 20/20s
12-12:40 – Our Society

BODEGA’S ALLEY
8:00 – 8:40 Swing Fever
9:00-9:40 – blet
10:00-10:40 – Her Flyaway Manner
11:00-11:40 – Tylynn
12:00-12:40 – Ezra
1:00-1:40 – The Silver Rabbit

1867 BAR
7:40-8:20 The Other Side of Now
8:40-9:20 – Sweats
9:40-10:20 – Emily Bass and the Near Miracle
10:40-11:20 – Producers of The Word
11:40-12:20 – Hakim
12:40-1:20 – After Arizona

Friday, Feb. 8

ZOO BAR
5:00-5:40 Prairie Psycho
6:00-6:40 – Gabe Nelson w/ Pants
7:00-7:40 – Big Daddy Caleb and The Chargers
8:00-8:40 – The Morbs
9:00-9:40 – Stonebelly
10:00-10:40 – Night Push
11:00-11:40 – Artichoke Hearts
12:00-12:40 – Body Garden

DUFFY’S TAVERN
6:20-7 Nate Armstrong and the Fiddlin Fool
7:40-8:20 – Gnawstic
8:40-9:20 – The Dancing Dead
9:40-10:20 – Said Mantics
10:40-11:20 – Dazzle Ships
11:40-12:20 – Evan Bartels and The Stoney Lonesomes
12:40-1:20 – Dudes Gone Rude

BODEGA’S ALLEY
7-7:40 – Could Be Cursed
8-8:40 – Sputnik Kaputnik
9-9:40 – Eddy Mink
10-10:40 – Gerardo Meza and the Dead of Night
11-11:40 – Hex Weaver
12-12:40 – Cornerstone Dub
1-1:40 – Bogusman

1867 BAR
7:40-8:20 – The Rewind
8:40-9:20 – Leaves Brown
9:40-10:20 – Ro Hempel Band
10:40-11:20 – Laughing Falcon
11:40-12:20 – Blowing Chunks
12:40 – 1:20 – Radiant Bones

Saturday, Feb. 9

ZOO BAR
5-5:30 – Floating Opera
6-6:40 – Frailin Hearts
7-7:40 – Charlie Burton and Or What
8-8:40 – Verse & The Vices
9-9:40 – Undisco Kids
10-10:40 – Wildwoods
11-11:40 – Killigans
12-12:40 – Oatmeal 97

DUFFY’S TAVERN
KZUM 41ST BIRTHDAY BASH
6:20-7 – Red Cities
7:40-8:20 – Hangin’ Cowboys
8:40 – 9:20 – Jazzocracy
9:40-10:20 – Cuddlebone
10:40-11:20 – Ivisi
11:40-12:20 – Jack Hotel
12:40-1:20 – Unmanned

BODEGA’S ALLEY
7:00-7:40 – Deadbeat
8:00-8:40 – Yellow After Rain
9:00-9:40 – The Inbetweens
10:00-10:40 – Talent Show
11:00-11:40 – Dirty Talker
12:00-12:40 – Mobius
1:00-1:40 – The Midland Band

1867 BAR
7:40-8:20 – Rift
8:40-9:20 – Ghost Town Radio
9:40-10:20 – Mike Semrad & The River Hawks
10:40-11:20 – Hammersaw
11:40-12:20 – Salt Creek
12:40-1:20 – The Fey

* * *

Meanwhile, back here in Omaha tonight, Epitaph recording artist Hunny plays at Reverb Lounge. From Newbury Park, CA. Opening is Kanine Records act Hockey Dad, whose latest, 2018’s Blend Inn, was produced by John Goodmanson (Bikini Kill, Sleater-Kinney). $18, 8 p.m.

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Review: Spielbergs, This Is Not the End; Trump re-election (in the column)…

Category: Reviews — Tags: , — @ 1:37 pm February 5, 2019

Spielbergs, This Is Not the End (2019, By the Time It Gets Dark)

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Just a quick note to pass along a recommendation, in fact the first recommendation of 2019.

Spielbergs are a Norwegian trio that formed in Oslo back in 2016. Their name is (you guessed it) a sort of tribute to Steven Spielberg, apparently after seeing Close Encounters for the first time.

This Is Not the End is their full-length debut, which came out last Friday on tiny indie label By the Time It Gets Dark Records. No doubt these kids grew up listening to ’90s-era indie as the record combines all the best qualities from the best bands of that time period. They’ve been compared to Japandroids, Titus Andronicus and No Age, but to me they’ve got more in common with the grinding indie rock of Superchuck and the massive hooks on early Teenage Fanclub albums.

A little past halfway through the album is a 7-plus minute epic tonal composition that sounds like Yo La Tengo combined with a modern-day Trent Reznor soundtrack. Titled “McDonald’s (Please Don’t Fuck Up My Order)” it underscores the understated humor that runs throughout this album. And it’s gorgeous. It’s followed by “Sleeper,” an acoustic number with the same simply beauty as “A Pillow of Winds” from Pink Floyd’s Meddle.

Those two quiet songs are the exception to the rule on an album that consists mostly of bombastic, feedback-fueled anthem rockers that are going to sound even better this summer. A great way to start off 2019…

* * *

This month’s Over the Edge column for The Reader went online this morning, just in time for the State of the Union address. It’s a cautionary tale about what Trump would have to do to win a second term, and how easy it would be (if Trump wasn’t Trump). You can read it online here or in the February issue of The Reader, on newsstands somewhere…

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Weekend in Review: Almost Music (Pagan Athletes, Wagon Blasters), Matt Whipkey; No Thanks, Hussies tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , , — @ 1:51 pm February 4, 2019

Matt Whipkey and his band at Reverb Lounge Feb. 2, 2019.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

It was a shoulder-to-shoulder crowd at Almost Music Saturday night around 8 p.m., the store filled with revelers celebrating the unfortunate demise of an Omaha music store. Some of the book shelves had been moved out of the Solid Jackson side to make room for the crowds watching the bands. In back they were doling out what can only be described as “doses” of the Nite Owl “punch” that indeed packed one. It was a happy though solemn affair as we were all happy to see the bands and each other, and sad that it was the last day for Almost Music and Solid Jackson, a store that will never be equaled (Unless Brad decides to open one again some day).

So crowded was the store that we couldn’t see Pagan Athletes, who were performing on the other side of the room. The synth/drummer duo was knocking out crazy futuristic jams, hyper-kinetic instrumentals that held the crowd in a trance with its jittery swing. The fine young man standing next to me drinking the blood-colored punch from a coffee cup said the band consists of John Wolf’s sons! Wolf is nothing less than an Omaha music legend behind such great bands as Cellophane Ceiling and Bad Luck Charm (among others). No doubt talent runs in the family. Check out some Pagan Athletes demos below.

 

Wagon Blasters at Almost Music’s farewell show, Feb. 2, 2019.

Speaking of legends, Pagan Athletes was followed by Wagon Blasters, the next evolutionary step in the ever mutating genre of Nebraska Tractor Punk. Gary Dean Davis was in his usual fine form, as was the rest of the band, who I could barely see while standing  atop a three-foot step ladder, where I took the above photo (I never got a clear shot of Pagan Athletes).

We only hung around for a couple Blasters songs, overcome by ennui generated by the knowledge that we wouldn’t be able to stop into Almost Music again on Saturdays after lunch at Noli’s. Brad, we salute you (and by the way, you hit the nail squarely on the head with that Rat Columns album — primo!).

We headed cross town to catch Matt Whipkey’s set at Reverb Lounge. Whipkey has been performing in a variety of bands and projects for almost two decades, and while rock has always been the staple, his style has varied from Americana to heavy metal (or close to it). That variety makes for a fine selection of songs and styles, which we got a heathy sample of Saturday night.

It’s become known in some circles that Whipkey has been working on a secret project, and sure enough he rolled out one of those songs last night — a punk version of “Fred, You’re Dead” (of which there’s a slower version on his last album, Driver). When will Whipkey reveal this full punk project? Only time will tell…

* * *

Tonight Cam Stout celebrates her birthday at The Brothers Lounge. I don’t know who Cam is, but I like her taste in music, as the bands No Thanks and Hussies are both performing in her honor. $5, 10 p.m. Happy Birthday, Cam…

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

King Tuff, See Through Dresses, TFOA, HFM, #BFF tonight; Almost Music-fest, Matt Whipkey Saturday…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , , , — @ 1:46 pm February 1, 2019

Almost Music calls it quits with a huge rock show this Saturday.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Before we get to it, tickets went on sale today for both the March 21 Better Oblivion Community Center (Conor Oberst/Phoebe Bridgers) show at The Slowdown and the two-night stand by The Faint at The Waiting Room May 24 & 25. Better get on it before tix are gone…

Now, on with the weekend…

Sub Pop recording artist King Tuff plays tonight at Slowdown Jr. King Tuff a.k.a. Kyle Thomas was a member of Ty Segall’s band The Muggers. The Reader‘s Houstin Wiltsey has an interview/feature with King Tuff online right here, which you should really check out before the show. Australian psych-rock band Stonefield opens at 9 p.m. $17.

Also tonight See Through Dresses kicks off its latest tour with a show at The Sydney in Benson. This is a big one that also includes Those Far Out Arrows, Lincoln’s Her Flyaway Manner and the always awesome Tyrone Storm. Music starts at 10 p.m and it’s the usual $5. Get there early and check out the multi-artist art opening that benefits the amazing Youth Emergency Services. More info here. It’s all part of Benson First Friday (#BFF).

Speaking of BFF, if you’re in Benson for the festivities, swing by The Little Gallery (my wife’s place) and check out this month’s opening featuring the art of Bob Matthews. The Little Gallery is at 5901 Maple St. in the east bay of the Masonic Lodge building. Stop in and say hello. We’re there from 6 to 9 p.m. More info here.

Tomorrow (Saturday) is the Almost Music Going Out of Business Music Festival, a stupendous line-up of bands that starts at 4 p.m. Get in on the music and leave with some bargains as the store will have deeply discounted vinyl available. It’s free, though donations are welcomed; it’s BYOB; and Nite Owl is preparing a “special punch” for the occasion. And it’ll be a good chance to say goodbye to Brad and thank him for all he’s done. Here’s the set times:

Bad Actors (first show): 4:15-5:00
Eric in Outerspace: 5:15-6:00
Kyle Jessen: 6:00-6:45
Putter & Co.: 6:45-7:30
Little Ripple: 7:30-8:15
Pagan Athletes: 8:15-9:00
Wagon Blasters: 9:00-9:45
Houma: 9:45-10:30
Conny Franko: 10:30-11:15
BIB: 11:15-midnight

Also Saturday night Matt Whipkey headlines at Reverb Lounge. Will Matt roll out a few new (punk) songs during his set? You’ll have to go and see. Hot new band Garst opens at 9 p.m. $8.

That’s all I got. If I missed your show, put it in the comments section. Have a great weekend.

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

#TBT: Jan. 29, 2009: Discovering Twitter and Mama, I’m Swollen; Jocelyn tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , , — @ 2:03 pm January 31, 2019

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Reaching back into the archive on this Throwback Thursday, to a time when Twitter was just getting going. Who’da thunk back than that Twitter would become the main tool for the country’s Biggest Tool? And yet, here we are. This column was a sort of introduction to Twitter, and the first time I used the tool for doing live concert reviews. It was also the last time. There’s no point in “real time” reporting a live concert in Twitter. It’s about as interesting as seeing pictures from people’s vacation while they’re still on vacation. Actually, isn’t that what Facebook is based on?

The concert I was tweeting from was a preview show by Cursive of material that would appear on Mama, I’m Swollen, which was released March 10, 2009, and is still one of my favorite Cursive albums.

From Lazy-i, Jan. 29, 2009…

Column 207: In a Twitter
The end of conversation.

Back in the old days — a few short years ago — just blogging was enough. People had a way of electronically publishing their ideas — no matter how mundane — in a format that was accessible to the entire world via the Internet. Bored college students in Toledo could now share their insights with bored college students in Gdansk about such nail-biting topics as: what they had for dinner, why they’re pissed at their boyfriend/girlfriend, and what’s on TV.

Now along comes Twitter. Well, not just now. Twitter’s been around since 2006 (according to Wikipedia, which itself has been around since 2001), but it seems like no one started using it until last year. Oh sure, there were a couple Twitter pioneers (drones who will proudly boast that they’ve been Tweeting (the verb form) for years), but the technology — and the term itself — only just entered our vernacular in the past year or so (or mine, at least).

Brief tech discussion: Twitter is a browser-based “social networking” environment that limits its users to 140 characters per post. The limit is there, in part, to facilitate the use of cell phones as input devices, along with the web. It also forces people to strenuously self-edit themselves, to carefully hone their ideas to only the most critical few words. Each comment answers the universal question: What are you doing? The result: Briefer discussions about what’s for dinner, boyfriends/girlfriends, and what’s on TV.

Unlike blogs (but like Facebook, which is another slice of entropy altogether) people search Twitter for their friends, and then “follow” them. Twitter aggregates everyone you’re “following” into one inane conversation, each comment conveniently time-stamped, something like:

Husker_power: Hungry. Taco Johns tonight fur shure. about 3 hours ago from TwitterBerry
Santinofan: Watching Top Chef. Ariane got screwed. Padme where are you? about 5 hours ago from web

And so on. Twitter appears to be a natural de-evolution of human interaction. Soon all discussions will be limited to Tarzan-like grunts, culminating in: “Poop. Pee. Eat. Poop. Screw. Eat. Simpsons. Poop.”

So why all this discussion about Twitter? About six months ago, I logged onto Twitter for the first time. You can “follow” my tweeting online at: twitter.com/tim_mcmahan. I quickly discovered that “micro-blogging” has its advantages. Take CD reviews, for instance. Instead of spending hours writing gripping, nuanced examinations of an album’s true meaning, I only have room for:

tim_mcmahan: Listening to the new Ladyfinger album. Brutal fun.

or

tim_mcmahan: Listening to new Springsteen. Nothing new here *yawn*.

Conversely, Twitter allows bands, record labels and assorted famous folk to keep in touch with their fans. I now know what The Willowz (thewillowz), Saddle Creek Records (saddlecreek) and Lance Armstrong (lancearmstrong) are having for lunch. For better or worse.

One perceived value of Twitter is the real-time nature of the medium. Instead of text messaging to one person, you’re text messaging to all of your “followers” at once. To test Twitters’ capabilities and limitations, I took my iPhone to Slowdown last Saturday night for the Cursive concert and annoyed everyone within a few feet of me by tapping in the following comments throughout the evening. Here’s the transcript/review:

tim_mcmahan: Full house. I’m buying Rolling Rocks two at a time. 10:34 PM Jan 24th from mobile web

tim_mcmahan: House music is Michael Jackson, or at least it sounds like Jacko. 10:37 PM

tim_mcmahan: Nice. Kasher’s voice sounds husky. 10:57 PM

tim_mcmahan: Classic Kasher rant. “Bark bark bark.” 11:11 PM

tim_mcmahan: Seems like they’re working trumpet into every song these days. For better or worse. 11:14 PM

tim_mcmahan: Some of this new stuff sounds like The Good Life. The convergence keeps getting closer. 11:31 PM

tim_mcmahan: Halfway through the set. Ted Stevens finally switches from the 12-string to his LP. 11:34 PM

tim_mcmahan: Kasher says he’s got a sore throat and is drinking hot tea. He sounds fine. 11:41 PM

tim_mcmahan: “What Have I Done.” Kasher’s back to the self-referential lyrics. Songs about writing songs. 11:44 PM

tim_mcmahan: His most soulful song since Domestica. 11:46 PM

tim_mcmahan: Cornbread on drums changes the entire complexion of Cursive. They swing now, moreso than the old frontal assault of Schnase. 11:54 PM

tim_mcmahan: Off stage now. Encore’s next. This is a longer set than Union Hall. 11:55 PM

tim_mcmahan: Back. With “Art is Hard.” Crowd loves it. Kasher’s right. Mostly kids huddled along the stage. 11:59 PM

tim_mcmahan: Never get tired of hearing “The Martyr.” 12:04 AM

tim_mcmahan: Okay, now his voice is giving out. 12:06 AM

tim_mcmahan: Struggling through “Sierra.” The last song of the night. 12:11 AM

tim_mcmahan: Kasher takes over the drum kit. 12:13 AM

tim_mcmahan: That’s it. Kasher won’t be talking for a week. 12:14 AM

Just like being there? Not really. Looking over the comments the following morning, I wondered if they needed to be augmented with explanations, but realized that anyone who knows me and what I write about understands the shorthand. They know who Kasher and Cursive is. They know the song titles and the terminology. And if they don’t, they can always find out. On Myspace or Facebook. On YouTube. On Wikipedia. Or on Twitter, which is effectively shoe-horning the world into a conversation that’s only 140 characters wide. For better or worse.

* * *

Tonight, BMG Recording artist Jocelyn releases the first single from her upcoming album, a song titled “Speak Up,” at Slowdown Jr. I’ve heard it and it’s pop-candy fun. Aly Peeler opens the show at 7 p.m. $10.

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

 

Lazy-i

Oberst/Bridgers, The Faint/Closeness Omaha dates, plus a big Saturday show announced…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 1:36 pm January 29, 2019

The Faint at the 2017 Maha Music Festival, Aug. 19, 2017. The band is playing at The Waiting Room May 24 and 25.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Here yesterday I said indie music is on the wane in Omaha (and it is) and today we have three big concerts announced.

The first is Better Oblivion Community Center — the new project featuring Conor Oberst and Phoebe Bridgers — announced they’re playing at The Slowdown March 21 with Lala Lala and Christian Lee Hutson. Tickets, which are $25, go on sale Friday at 11 a.m. This will sell out.

Check out the new BOCC video that dropped today, directed by Japanese Breakfast:

The other big announcement is that The Faint and Closeness are playing at The Waiting Room May 24 and 25. Choirboy also is on the bill. Tickets for this one also go on sale this Friday at 10 a.m. These will sell out as well.

And maybe the biggest announcement of all…

This Saturday Almost Music and Solid Jackson in the Blackstone District are hosting a concert from 4 p.m. until whenever in honor of them closing their doors. They’re going out of business, folks. If you’re looking for bargains, better get there now. When I stepped into the shop last Saturday all vinyl was 50 percent off.

The line-up for Saturday’s going-out-of-business concert:

Bad Actors (first show): 4:15-5:00
Eric in Outerspace: 5:15-6:00
Kyle Jessen: 6:00-6:45
Putter & Co.: 6:45-7:30
Little Ripple: 7:30-8:15
Pagan Athletes: 8:15-9:00
Wagon Blasters: 9:00-9:45
Houma: 9:45-10:30
Conny Franko: 10:30-11:15
BIB: 11:15-midnight

Donations are welcomed; it’s BYOB; and Nite Owl is preparing “special punch” for the occasion. It’s free so this one won’t sell out but it’ll definitely be SRO. Come say goodbye to a local hero.

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

See Through Dresses, Clarence Tilton, Dan Brennan, R.A.F., ARC Studios win OEA Awards…

Category: Blog — Tags: — @ 2:47 pm January 28, 2019

See Through Dresses at Maha Music Festival in 2016. The band won for Best Alternative/Indie band at last nights OEA Awards.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

A few words on last night’s Omaha Arts and Entertainment Awards ceremony held at The Slowdown…

I try to ignore this every year and every year I get sucked into the awards show, which last night was streamed live by the folks who run Omaha Magazine. I try to ignore it because: 1) I’ve never heard of many of the nominees, 2) Many of those I do recognize (as Dave Sink used to say about bands he didn’t like) aren’t my cup of tea, and 3) The bands that are my cup of tea rarely are nominated. I would like to tell you there’s a fourth reason — that I don’t like award shows — but that wouldn’t be true. I watch all of the film-related award shows on television. I haven’t missed an Oscars telecast in years, and I even have the Grammy’s on while I’m doing something more important, like clipping my toenails.

That said, there were a few bands who won awards last night that I’ve heard of and actually like. They are: See Through Dresses, which took home the award for Best Alternative/Indie; Clarence Tilton, who won for Best Country; Dan Brennan, the soundman at The Slowdown who won for Best Live Music Sound Engineer; R.A.F., who won for Best Punk, and ARC Studios, who won for Best Recording Studio.

You can see the full list of winners right here.

As one gets older one can lose touch of a scene, and that was obvious watching the broadcast light night and recognizing few of the nominees. Then again, my sights have always been set on indie music, a genre that is slowly slipping from importance locally.

Interestingly, the complex in which the award show was being presented — The Slowdown — was built by the folks behind Saddle Creek Records, who have offices right above the stage. Neither the label’s name nor any musician who has ever been on its roster was mentioned during last night’s proceedings, despite that fact that Saddle Creek has enjoyed great success in the past few years, as have many of the label’s musicians from the past who still call Omaha home. Not that it matters…

* * *

Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Eric in Outerspace, DROSS (NAWAS members) Saturday; Bazile Mills, Minne Lussa Sunday…

Category: Blog — Tags: , — @ 1:56 pm January 25, 2019

Eric in Outerspace at O’Leaver’s, Aug. 31, 2016. The band plays O’Leaver’s Saturday night.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Watched that Fyre Fest documentary last night (the Netflix version, not the Hulu version). The first question that came to mind after slogging through that slow-motion dumpster fire: How did Ja Rule avoid getting his ass sued off alongside Billy McFarland?

Onward to the weekend…

I can’t find a thing to do tonight show-wise. I suggest bellying up to the bar at The Brothers and enjoying their fine jukebox offerings. Now if only I could get Trey to stock Rolling Rock again…

Now, there are a number of shows Saturday…

Local indie stalwarts Eric in Outerspace headline Saturday night at fabulous O’Leaver’s. Joining them is DROSS (members of Noah’s Ark Was a Spaceship) and Cloud Feeder. $5, 10 p.m.

Also Saturday night, Benny and the Gents is doing another David Bowie tribute night at The Waiting Room. And She Was opens at 9. $10.

Around the corner at Reverb Lounge Saturday night, CJ Mills returns with Kethro and Masonjixx. 9 p.m., $8 Adv./$10 DOS.

Finally, there’s an early show at Reverb Sunday night headlined by indie Americana band Bazile Mills. Opening is Minne Lussa, a new project with Eric Ebers (Ritual Device), Alan Legge, Matt Rutledge on vocals and guitar, and Pat Reefe. This one starts at 5 p.m. and is $7.

That’s all I got. If I missed your show, put it in the comments section. Have a great weekend…

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

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Oberst/Bridgers’ BOCC plays Colbert show, drops debut on Dead Oceans; Noname tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , , , , — @ 12:15 pm January 24, 2019

Better Oblivion Community Center is Phoebe Bridgers and Conor Oberst, plus a host of indie rock veterans.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

In addition to rolling out Better Oblivion Community Center — the new band fronted by Conor Obert and Phoebe Bridgers — on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert last night, the band also dropped the entire debut album, released on Dead Oceans. Hey, who needs to wait ’til Friday to release an album?

Out front in the TV performance, which is embedded below, was a grizzled Oberst in Converse sneakers and the angelic Bridgers, who provided the prominent voice on song “Dylan Thomas.” Is Bridgers “Ally” to Oberst’s “Jack Maine”? We all know how that one ended. 

No, not quite; and the band also isn’t a return to the Laurel Canyon sound, as Rolling Stone seemed to imply in its 4-star review of the record. Instead, Oberst and Bridgers are building on top the current singer/songwriter movement associated with the artists like those in boygenius (Bridgers, Julien Baker, Lucy Dacus), Mitski, Big Thief, Soccer Mommy, and so on. Or maybe I’m just listening for Bridgers more than Oberst on these songs. Certainly you can’t miss Conor, who’s growly croon is an abrasive counter to Bridgers’ sweet coo. 

It’s easy to pick out who wrote what if you’ve been following along the last couple of years. The pretty, sad stuff is Bridgers; the folky slice of life stuff is Oberst. The sound isn’t so much a true duet as much as one guesting on the other’s songs. 

The only other person I recognized in the video last night was Nick Zinner of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, who’s as genius as ever on guitar.

Other BOCC participants according to the Q&A at the Secretly Store website are Carla Azar from Autolux; Wylie Gelber and Griffin Goldsmith of Dawes; songwriter Christian Lee Hutson on guitar and Anna Butterss on bass. The album was produced by Oberst and Bridgers with help from Andy LeMaster, who you might remember from Now It’s Overhead. 

Quite a splashy way to launch a project. I wonder when they’re going to drop the cheesy phone number/fake self-help program facade, which, because it wasn’t explained, came off clumsy last night on the Colbert show. My wife asked, “What’s with the graphics and the phone number on the screen?” It takes a long time to explain the joke. Hopefully they’ll leave it off when they play this weekend on CBS This Morning Saturday.

BOCC tour stops apparently will be announced next week sometime. Here’s hoping for an Omaha date. 

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Noname (a.k.a. Fatimah Warner) is a Chicago indie hip-hop artist. Her self-released debut Room 25 chronicles the two years since the release of her debut mixtape Telefone, “most notably her move from Chicago to Los Angeles and an intense, short-lived relationship that resulted in the loss of her virginity at age 25,” says the Wiki. She headlines tonight at The Waiting Room. Opener Elton kicks things off at 8 p.m $25. 

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2019 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

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