J Mascis, Luluc at The Waiting Room tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , — @ 12:35 pm October 8, 2014
J Mascis headlines tonight at The Waiting Room.

J Mascis headlines tonight at The Waiting Room.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Big show tonight at The Waiting Room where Dinosaur Jr.’s J Mascis takes the stage.

To give you a taste of what you might be in store for, Mascis’ set list from his Oct. 4 show in Louisville, KY, included five Dinosaur Jr. songs (including “Get Me” off ’93’s Where you Been, and “Ocean in the Way” off ’09’s Farm), a Mazzy Star cover (“Fade Into You”) and a Cure tune (“Just Like Heaven”), as well as solo number “Every Morning,” which is the first video off his new Sub Pop release, Tied to a Star (and the reason he’s on the road). Sub Pop labelmates Luluc open. $17, 8 p.m.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

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Sun Kil Moon’s lullaby to War on Drugs; The Paul Collins Beat, Sons of The Slowdown tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , — @ 12:36 pm October 7, 2014

Trying to decide what I think about the whole Mark Kozelek / Sun Kil Moon / War on Drugs thing, and realized that I don’t really care. That it’s all fun and games for Kozelek, who doesn’t give a shit what anyone thinks of him. I like both artists. SKM’s Benji album is one of my all-time favorites. War on Drugs most recent album — and concert — will both be on my year-end favorites list. The rest is just white noise.

That said, here’s the link to the infamous “War on Drugs: Suck my Cock” track, which you can also download as an mp3 file from Pitchfork (don’t click on the player on the page, click on the link for the download).

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Tonight at Slowdown Jr. Paul Collins of the band The Beat (and The Nerves) headlines, and opening is none other than The Sons of The Slowdown (alone worth the price of admission). 8:30 p.m., $8.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Lincoln Calling starts this week; Colony House tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , — @ 1:02 pm October 6, 2014
Lincoln Calling 2014 starts tomorrow.

Lincoln Calling 2014 starts tomorrow.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

All the action is happening in Lincoln this week as the 11th annual Lincoln Calling kicks off Tuesday. Actually, the live music portion of LC doesn’t begin until Wednesday. Tomorrow is dedicated to two film festivals happening at The Bourbon Theater.

All the details are at lincolncalling.com. I think it’s safe to say that Lincoln Calling is Nebraska’s largest indie music festival — or for that matter, the closest we get to having a real festival. Eight venues over five nights and god knows how many bands, mostly local but with a sprinkling of regional acts thrown in. My only complaint is that it takes place in Lincoln.

Could Omaha — or more specifically, Benson — host a similar multi-day festival where the participating bands actually get paid something? It would take someone with the same level of dedication as LC mastermind Jeremy Buckley to get it off the ground.  So the answer is probably no, though an organization like Hear Nebraska would be a natural for such a festival. So would Maha in conjunction with its annual concert. Lord knows Benson has the facilities to handle a multi-day local/regional blowout…

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Tennessee indie pop band Colony House headlines tonight at Reverb Lounge. I never heard of these guys but they’ve got nearly 35,000 Facebook likes (whatever that’s worth). With Little Rock’s Knox Hamilton and Philly band Cheerleader. $10, 9 p.m.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

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Domestica, Drakes Hotel, Little Brazil, Brad Hoshaw, BFF tonight; Millions of Boys Saturday…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , , — @ 12:50 pm October 3, 2014
Little Brazil at The Waiting Room, July 19, 2014. The band is playing for free tonight at The Sydney.

Little Brazil at The Waiting Room, July 19, 2014. The band is playing for free tonight at The Sydney.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Lots of (cheap) local shows this weekend, especially tonight.

Tonight at fabulous O’Leaver’s Lincoln punk legends Domestica are on a showbill headlined by (ex-Filter King) Gerald Lee’s sludge/stoner band Nightbird. Opening is Lincoln’s Once a Pawn. $5, 9:30 p.m.

Back in Benson at The Sydney Little Brazil headlines a free show with The Brigadiers and Well Aimed Arrows (who, I’m told, has wrapped up recording a new album). The fun starts at 9.

Over at The Barley Street, local post-punk band Drakes Hotel is on a bill that includes The Bishops, The Toppings and Brief Candles. If the website listing is correct, Drakes plays first. $5, 9 p.m.

Finally, Brad Hoshaw and Low Long Signal open for the debut of Foreign Body at Benson’s newest lounge/concert space Reverb (read all about the bar here). $5, 9 p.m.

And remember, tonight is Benson First Friday. Get your parking where you can.

Let’s not forget that Relax, It’s Science headlines at Slowdown Jr. tonight with Nanahara and Timecat. $5, 9 p.m.

I keep forgetting that it’s football season and Husker games pretty much drive rock shows off the calendar on Saturdays. That said, there’s at least one show going on tomorrow night, and it’s at Reverb. Millions of Boys headlines with Dan Mariska and the Boys Choir and The Crash Bandits. $7, 9 p.m.

That’s what I got. If I missed your show, put it in the comments section. Have a good weekend.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

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Reverb: Omaha’s Mid-Century live music lounge (in the column); and how many bars are in Benson, anyway?

Category: Blog,Interviews — Tags: , , — @ 1:01 pm October 2, 2014

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

A look inside the new Reverb Lounge as well as some Q&A with one of its owners, Jim Johnson, is the subject of my column this week. Jim talks about his vision for the club and why One Percent decided to open another bar literally feet away from two other bars they own. It’s in this week’s issue of The Reader and online right here.

As I say in the column, I foresee that I’ll be spending a lot of time at Reverb. As Omaha continues to get bigger and bigger, I’m spending more and more time in a smaller geographical location — i.e., Benson. Back in the old days, going to shows would mean driving to way south to Sokol, to downtown Omaha, out to The Asylum on West Center, and so on. These days most of my time is spent on Maple Street, with the occasional trek to O’Leaver’s. I haven’t been to The Slowdown in a few months (due to a combination of factors including 1) going to fewer mid-week shows, 2) Slowdown booking more private functions on weekends, along with 3) Slowdown booking fewer indie shows).

My coverage is definitely becoming too Benson focused, both in this blog and in my column. There is a world west of 72nd Street, though these days, I rarely step foot in it. And with clubs like Reverb opening, I’m less apt to.

So what’s the current bar count in Benson? Let’s see (not counting restaurants that serve booze): Jerry’s, Full House, Beercade, Krug Park, The Waiting Room, Burke’s, 1912, The Sydney, The Musette, St. Andrews, Benson Brewery, Infusion, Jake’s, The Barley Street and now Reverb. That’s 15 (and I’m probably missing something). That’s a lot of bars in about a half-mile stretch of road.

You have to ask yourself if there’s enough people to keep them all afloat.

BTW, news to me (though probably news to no one else), Jim told me that The Waiting Room is only open when an event or show is booked. Did not know that.

Some other comments that didn’t make it into the column:

— There will be tables and chairs added to Reverb’s concert space when appropriate. Jim is even considering adding row seating for some performances.

— There are no TVs in Reverb, nor video games or pinball.

— Jim said they’ll be adding some “sound treatment” to the concert room in the near future.

Again, you really need to check it out, whether there’s a show scheduled (check out their website to see) or not. And man, they make a potent mai tai.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

New Lungs, Little Gold, Saintseneca, Beach Fossils (in Lincoln) tonight…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 12:48 pm October 1, 2014
New Lungs play at O'Leaver's tonight...

New Lungs play at O’Leaver’s tonight…

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Trying to think of some news to pass along… The new Prince records? Not feeling it. The new Thom Yorke? Nope. If you’re looking for something noisy and weird, you could do worse than checking out Useless Eaters LP Bleeding Moon (Castle Face). Modern, spiked garage rock. Or maybe not.

Busy Wednesday show-wise…

It’s a night of fine, fine rock at fabulous O’Leaver’s this evening. Been awhile since I’ve seen the crew from New Lungs. I believe D-Max and Co. have been working on some new stuff.  Opener Athens band Little Gold plays gritty, harmonica-infused indie rock. They kind of remind me of Centro-matic crossed with D. Jr., but only because of lead guy Christian DeRoeck’s gravel voice. Check out the tracks below. Swamp Walk kicks it off at 9:30. $5.

Tonight at Slowdown Jr. Columbus Ohio band Saintseneca headlines. The band recorded their latest album, Dark Arc (ANTI-) with Mike Mogis at ARC Studios, just up the street from the new Panda Express. It’s straight-up acoustic indie rock. Pretty. Bloomington’s Busman’s Holiday and our very own McCarthy Trenching open. $10, 9 p.m.

I typically don’t write about Lincoln shows because, well, they’re in Lincoln. And I’m in Omaha. And the chances of me driving to Lincoln during the week (or even on the weekend) are pretty slim. If I had chutzpah, I would make the drive tonight for Beach Fossils at Vega. This show is really a Captured Tracks showcase featuring label mates Heavenly Beat and Axxa/Abraxas. Captured Tracks has it going on. You should check it out. $17, 9 p.m.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Live Review: Sebadoh and the debut of Reverb’s concert space…

Category: Blog,Reviews — Tags: , , , — @ 12:54 pm September 29, 2014
Sebadoh at Reverb Lounge, Sept. 28, 2014.

Sebadoh at Reverb Lounge, Sept. 28, 2014.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

First off, there will be a full write-up about Reverb in this week’s column, a detailed look at the place and what it means in the larger picture of the Omaha music scene. That’s out Thursday. This is a review of last night’s kick-off show, and man, it was a bumpy ride.

The problems with the vocal PA seemed obvious during See Through Dresses’ opening set. Instrumentally, the band sounded great, you just couldn’t hear the vocals, they were dead or gone from the first note. Who to blame — was it something the band was doing wrong on stage or was it the sound guy? The vocals were simply buried in the mix and stayed that way.

Then came Sebadoh. Let’s not make more out of the incident than it was. By the second song, Lou Barlow was clearly irritated. “Can you hear me?” About a dozen hands went up with thumbs pointed at the ceiling, indicating more vocals. Barlow apologized, saying it was the first show for the club, that it “sounded like shit,” and mentioned something about giving the crowd its money back.

Then he left took off his guitar and left the stage. Jason Loewenstein, sporting a bass at this point in the set, looked up and said, “What did you guys say?” A few moments later, Barlow returned to a smattering of applause before kicking into their next song, which had virtually non-existent vocals. Then they went right into “On Fire” and things got noticeably better as two sound guys poured over the digital sound board trying to figure out what was wrong.

Next, Barlow’s amp broke. “I guess this room doesn’t like guitars.” Loewenstein came to the rescue with a spare guitar pedal and the show went on, and by the next song or two, the vocals gradually got better. By the end of the first Barlow-sung portion of the set, Lou could be heard fairly clearly, but the PA never had the necessary heft to really cut through the rest of the band’s equipment.

After Loewenstein’s set, Barlow apologized again. “Sorry I was so pouty earlier. I ran off stage to drink some wine and when I got back the sound was better.

I assume the band did a sound check earlier in the afternoon. If they had, they would have noticed the problem (It wasn’t one of those deals where “the crowd muffled the mix” — Reverb is way too small for that). Did something happen between sound check and the first set? Who knows.

A look at the crowd from the edge of the stage during See Through Dresses' set.

A look at the crowd from the edge of the stage during See Through Dresses’ set.

It was an inauspicious start for a new club with lots of promise. Located through the main lounge, entering the performance room is like walking into a sound stage, albeit a tiny sound stage. I couldn’t believe how small the room looked. It is, in essence, a gray box with a stage raised about four feet off the ground built into the wall. Maybe it was the high ceilings or the lack of tables and chairs, but the room seemed downright microscopic. The performance space is definitely bigger than The Barley Street’s or Sweatshop’s, but is it bigger than O’Leaver’s? I don’t know.

With its poured concrete floors, gray paint, no windows and exposed ceiling, the room is austere. The only decoration is a series of black-and-white concert photos that line the room at eye level, further accentuating the high ceiling. Then there’s the stage itself. Small, back-curtained with LED spotlight racks mounted on the ceiling in front of and behind the band. The only outcrop in the room is the sound board in the back directly facing the stage.

With all that concrete, featureless walls and high ceiling, I expected the sound to be brash and bouncy and was pleasantly surprised at how well directed it sounded. No doubt it was loud — bands aren’t going to need much to fill the space, which will help keep the sound down in the main lounge (where, no surprise, you could clearly hear the band during the set).

I’m no audio engineer, but the flaw seems to be the vocal PA. (From what I could see) the system has two smallish overhead arrays and a couple subs built under the stage. I didn’t have a chance to check out the stage monitors. As Barlow said himself a couple times from stage, hey, this is the first show. Give it time and this is going to be a great room.

The performance itself was solid. Barlow’s getting shaggy in his old age, with a big head of hair and a massive beard. His voice was as good as ever (when I could hear it). Loewenstein also was in fine form (especial on his personal anthem, “My Drugs”), despite suffering from a tooth ache (They’ll be looking for an oral surgeon today). Ouch.

One Percent said they sold 115 tickets and purposely kept the number at that level to make for a comfortable show, and comfortable it was. Moving around the room was easy, with plenty of space against the back wall and good sight lines throughout. I guess the room is bigger than I thought.

Having a second exit along the opposite side of the soundboard makes exiting easy. I’d like to see the room “warmed up” a bit aesthetically – it’s rather sterile and barren now. That said, it is indeed an intimate experience. It definitely felt like a private show. Someone said “I’d pay $200 to see Sonic Youth in this room.” Now wouldn’t that be killer?

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

It’s True, Eros and the Eschaton tonight; Sebadoh, Literature, Dandy Warhols Sunday…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , — @ 12:51 pm September 26, 2014
Sebadoh plays at Reverb Sunday night.

Sebadoh plays at Reverb Sunday night.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

Expect a mob scene tonight at The Barley Street Tavern for the Eros and the Eschaton show, which also features a solo version of It’s True — Adam Hawkins singing some of your favorites from year’s past. The Barley Street music room can get crowded simply when all the performing bands are in there at once, so yeah, it could get crowded. Best bet is to get there early for Gramps — the new-ish combo by Django Greenblatt-Seay of Love Drunk fame. Also on the bill is Charioteer. Four bands, $5, 9 p.m.

Also tonight, Buckhunter and M34n Str33t headline a night of electronic music at The Waiting Room that includes BOTH, Sharkweek, DFM, & Kethro. $8, 9 p.m.

Mitch Gettman and his band plays tonight at the Harney Street Tavern with Custom Catacombs. 9 p.m. and free.

Meanwhile, at fabulous O’Leaver’s, The Electroliners will headline a show tonight with Boone, NC band Hedleg Husky and Kate Berreckman. $5, 9 p.m.

BTW, tonight also is the grand opening of Reverb, the new club owned and operated by One Percent Productions located just north of Jake’s in balmy downtown Benson. No music is scheduled, but the bar will be open starting at 4 so you can get a look-see.

Tomorrow night Aaron Freeman, former lead singer of Ween, headlines at The Waiting Room with Arc Iris. $15, 9 p.m.

Over at the Barley Street Saturday night Travelling Mercies headlines with 24 Hour Cardlock, The Tinder Box and The Willards Band. $5, 9 p.m.

It all leads to Sunday night and the kick-off show at Reverb (TWR Jr.?) featuring Sebadoh. Opening is See Through Dresses. Tickets are still available for $20, 9 p.m.

Also Sunday night, Slumberland Records artist Literature headlines at Sweatshop Gallery with White Fang, Nathan Ma & the Rosettes and Eric In Outerspace. $7, 9 p.m.

Finally, our old friends The Dandy Warhols are headlining at The Waiting Room (TWR Sr.?) Sunday night with Bonfire Beach. $20, 9 p.m.

Did I forget your show? Put it in the comments section. Have a good weekend.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Live Review: The War on Drugs; Mike Watt Vs. Ty Segall tonight…

Category: Blog,Reviews — Tags: , — @ 12:55 pm September 25, 2014
The War on Drugs at The Waiting Room, Sept. 24, 2014.

The War on Drugs at The Waiting Room, Sept. 24, 2014.

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

After catching the last couple songs by opener Califone (stunning) I wondered if I picked the wrong show. Surely Chvrches was going to be an audio/visual spectacle, a big-barn light show with plenty of compressed zings and a cooing frontwoman and lots and lots of young folks getting “into the groove.” Whereas The War on Drugs’ crowd was what I imaged it would be — a sausage party of music geeks like myself who know a good song when they hear it and want to see if the band can pull it off live.

That can mean a rather boring show — a handful of musicians on stage standing around playing their songs exactly as they sound on the record, with not much to see except hunched shoulders and contorted faces gripped in concentration, as opposed to Chvrches’ playground ride.

War on Drugs frontman Adam Granduciel.

War on Drugs frontman Adam Granduciel.

The band strolled on stage a little after 10, frontman Adam Granduciel looking like (as one social media comment put it), a young Ronnie James Dio with his shaggy, saggy long hair and denim jacket over T–shirt. Granduciel is the epitome of ’70s/’80s rock, from his appearance to his music, which despite modern flourishes really is a throwback to a time when people listened to songs for the melodies rather than the vibe.

TWOD’s appeal comes from its soaring guitar lines (reminiscent of ’80s New Wave pop), unobtrusive keyboard lines, Granduciel’s nasal Dylan-styled vocals and (most importantly) Charlie Hall’s straight-forward rock-n-roll drumming so rife with backbeat, so obvious that you can’t help but nod your head to it. Hall’s style is so crisp you could mistake it for a drum machine, keeping the most amorphous songs pumping away. In fact, half the tunes began with long, winding guitar drones or keyboards that laid flat until Hall kicked them into gear.

I tapped down a note during one particularly long high-throttle session, where the guitars were doing some back-and-forth after the melody was over: “Allman Brothers meets Dire Straits.” TWOD sounds like neither of course, instead capturing the spirit of both bands thanks to the guitar interplay and the rhythm section. At other times I was reminded of Jim James and My Morning Jacket. Then there’s the whole Dylan thing.

Throughout the set Granduciel teased that he was going to play his cover of “Tangled Up in Blue” at some point in the evening. “I’m going to try it without the lyric sheet tonight,” he grinned. But after an hour it was obvious he wasn’t going to play the Dylan chestnut until either very late in the set or during an encore. And believe it or not, some of us had to work the next morning.

So. On and on. You reach a point where you say to yourself, “I got it. These guys aren’t going to do anything different than what I’ve seen and heard for the past hour. I’ve heard my favorite songs. Why am I still here?

I waited through two more soaring numbers (including a chomping version of “Red Eyes”) before I gave up the ghost. About 15 minutes after I got home someone posted on Facebook “Tangled Up in Blue!” Well. It’s not as if that was the reason I bought a ticket to the show in the first place.

The War on Drugs is a band destined to do more than the tiny little indie-rock world can provide. They have a style and sound destined for arenas, if Granduciel can write a breakthrough record. No doubt Lost in the Dream was a breakthrough from an indie point of view, but he’ll need something bigger to get to the next level, something the crowd can sing along to. Or he could get caught in the endless indie morpheus loop, putting out record after record after record, each one well respected, forever nurturing a small-but-strong following. Or they could become this generation’s Counting Crows. I don’t know which fate is worse. Here’s hoping they become this generation’s Arcade Fire, growing to arena proportions, taking a different path every time out.

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Ty Segall’s new record, Manipulator, is a slick garage rock album with the usual psychedelic sheen, great guitars and an abundance of simple songs. This is Segall’s most pop-friendly set to date. Could he be the next Jack White (Well, I certainly like Segall’s music more).

Live, Segall brings a wall-of-sound approach to his rock concerts and I have no doubt he’ll do it again tonight at The Waiting Room. In addition to mighty guitar licks, expect a selection from the new album along with some back catalog faves. In addition, Segall has been known to pull out a handful of covers during a set. At his Chicago show Tuesday night he tossed in three Bowie songs (including “Queen Bitch”), according to setlist.fm. $15, 9 p.m.

Mike Watt’s latest effort, Il Sogno Del Marinaio, is another in a series of experimental projects by the Minutemen bassist that leans closer to improvisational jazz and beat poetry than rock. Still, the man is legend. At Slowdown Jr., $13, 9 p.m.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

Lazy-i

Chvrches Vs. The War on Drugs (SOLD OUT), Synaesthesia, Vibrators tonight; Reverb opens Friday…

Category: Blog — Tags: , , , — @ 12:52 pm September 24, 2014
The War on Drugs plays tonight at The Waiting Room...

The War on Drugs plays tonight at The Waiting Room…

by Tim McMahan, Lazy-i.com

The indie music cage match we’ve all been waiting for finally goes down tonight. I intend to be at The Waiting Room for The War on Drugs, mainly because I like their records more than Chvrches’ records, but also because it’s close by, it’s cheaper and I like the opening act, Califone, more than The Range. That said, there will be more people at Sokol Auditorium tonight for Chvrches. You can’t go wrong with either show.

The detes: The War On Drugs is $15, starts at 9 at The Waiting Room; Chvrches is $20, starts at 8 p.m. at Sokol Auditorium. As of this posting, tickets are still available for Chvrches, but War on Drugs is SOLD OUT.

There are other shows happening tonight if you’re not digging the indie choices.

Mason Brown, whose work includes stints with Tilly and the Wall, Coyote Bones, Icky Blossoms and Jet by Day, will be performing tonight as part of a project called Color-Tone Drone. Brown says it’s “a guitar orchestra conducted by colors. I’ve done a couple here in Atlanta. This particular performance will feature 16 guitarists from various local Omaha bands.” The performance is called Synaesthesia. Opening is Omaha legend Dereck Higgins and TBD Dance Collective. $5, 9 p.m.

Here’s the trailer for the Atlanta version of the show that took place earlier this summer. Looks like a head trip:

More details here and here.

Also tonight, UK punk legends The Vibrators try to tear apart The Brothers Lounge. I think drummer John “Eddie” Edwards is the only original member. Regardless, should be a fun show, with Hand Painted Police Car opening. $7, 9 p.m.

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One Percent Productions announced this morning that their new club, Reverb, will open at 4 p.m. this Friday.  The new club is just north of Jake’s at 6121 Military Ave., and will have its official break-in show this coming Sunday featuring Sebadoh, which (surprisingly) is still not sold out.

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Read Tim McMahan’s blog daily at Lazy-i.com — an online music magazine that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the national indie music scene with a special emphasis on the best original bands in the Omaha area. Copyright © 2014 Tim McMahan. All rights reserved.

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